Freshly Squeezed Shorts

RMIT Cinema, Sunday 24th February, 1pm

CONTENT INFORMATION

This session is restricted to persons over 15 years. It contains content relating to suicide. Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples should be aware that this session may contain images of people who have passed away.

An eclectic mix of short films in different genres and styles that push boundaries of gender, sexuality, culture, and identity - exploring the many facets of Australian life and society.

Photo 1 Docked_FilmStill_01_web.jpg

Docked (2018 / 20 mins)

Victorian Premiere

A young South Sudanese aspiring actress works late nights at a bar, where she meets an older guy at a crisis point in his life. As they spend the night walking and talking around Melbourne, these two people from different worlds find an unlikely connection. Sundance Institute Fellow Amie Batalibasi is passionate about creating stories that explore universal feelings such as melancholy. Modelled after the “mumblecore” films of the 90s, Docked juxtaposes dynamic locations and diverse casting to push the storytelling into a place little explored in Australian cinema

Writer / Director – Amie Batalibasi

 
Photo 5 Screen_Shot_2018-08-14_at_1.16.26_pm.jpg

Penny, You Did Just Fine (2018 / 3 mins)

Penny You Did Just Fine focuses on the all-too-fleeting moments between life and death. In this quiet and contemplative film, an older woman reflects on her relationship with a beloved pet, who has since passed away – and perhaps on her own mortality. Premiering at the 2018 Melbourne Underground Film Festival Director, Penny You Did Just Fine provides a powerful platform for women’s voices in a male-orientated industry.

Director / Producer – Madeleine Mytkowski

Writer - Zachary McDonald

 
Poster 2d1a4502df-poster.jpg

Sink (2018 / 7 mins)

When Jess, a young woman living in a rural community, falls in love for the first time, she is unable to reveal to her friends and family that it is with a woman. Her secret lover’s suicide drives Jess to grief and despair, culminating in a shocking act of self-harm to express her pent-up emotions. Featuring the talents of legendary actress Susie Porter (Wentworth), Sink is an intimate study of young love and intolerance in rural Australia – a reflection on the high LGBTQI youth mortality rates within Australian farming communities and the lesbian experience in regional areas.

Director – Cloudy Rhodes

Writer / Producer – Roger Joyce

 
Photo 4 still_4.jpg

Ladies' Lounge (2018 / 8 mins)

In 1965 rural Victoria, a woman chains herself to the foot rail of her local pub to protest the gender segregation laws of the time. But Eleanor’s fight for liberation puts her domestic security at risk and threatens to ostracise her from the community. Based on an incredible true story and made by a mostly female and LGBTQ+ identifying crew, Ladies’ Lounge is the rare Australian film that centres around a gay female protagonist, offering a compelling story of local feminist history.

Writer / Director – Monique Bettello

Producer – Gokce Sel

 
Photo 1 Screen_Shot_2018-07-25_at_2.14.49_pm.jpg

Single Man's Hut (2018 / 9 mins)

Inside a sandstone building, historically the living quarters provided for single men working on an estate, a woman dances alone. In Single Man’s Hut, dialogue is replaced by movement and music – breaking through our conditioned ideas of gender to explore the dual masculine and feminine natures that exist in all of us. Single Man’s Hut combines the photographer and dancer skills of its creators The Samaya Wives – who have received numerous awards for their talents around the world, including Winner of Best Dance On Film at the Australian Dance Awards in 2017.

Directors – Pippa Samaya, Tara Jade Samaya

 
Photo 1 000006.jpg

Salt in Wounds (2018 / 10 mins)

A Filipino-Australian teenager is enjoying a sweet romance with her boyfriend, when she discovers that his taste in porn in purely Caucasian. This realisation forces her to confront her identity and her social group, as she tries to work out where she fits in white Australian society – searching for a sense of belonging. First-time director Alison Adriano brings together a passionate team of young filmmakers who seek to contribute to the changing cultural and gender landscape of film – beyond traditional Anglo heterosexual representations of love.

Writer / Director – Alison Adriano

Producers – Elise Tyson, Harrison Leech

 

You, Me & Karen (2017 / 11 mins)

Set in a near-future world where technology has taken over the rituals of romance, a young woman is tired of the dates that the algorithm sets up for her. However, when she runs into an old flame without a dating app, she discovers a glimmer of genuine connection. You, Me & Karen is a sly social commentary on our ever-increasing addiction to technology and the way it dominates our communications – including our romantic interactions. This biting satire highlights the necessity of maintaining real human relationships.

Director – Karina Castan

Writer – Clare Toonen

Producer – Jamie Ross-Brown

Photo 2 Screen_Shot_2018-03-28_at_4.15.33_PM.jpg
 
Poster 42ce8c6c22-poster.jpg

RIFT (2017 / 11 mins)

Two indigenous teenage girls find their friendship put to the test as external influences begin to pull them in different directions. When they skip dance class to hang out with some local boys, the girls are lured into an attempted robbery – causing them to question their different values and priorities. Made in collaboration with the WAAPA Aboriginal Theatre Course, Rift explores the subtle influence of indigenous culture, the pressure of choices and the rift that threatens a delicate young female friendship.

Director – Quentin Curzon

Writer – Clare Toonen

Producer – Hannah Ngo

 
Waterfall_1.4.5-1280x720-c-default.jpg

Waterfall (2018 / 15 mins)

14 year old Zahra cannot come to terms with her Iranian mother’s new Australian fiancé, Peter. In an attempt to unite the family, Peter and Leila take Zahra on a road trip in search of a waterfall. Travelling deeper into the rainforest, Zahra’s growing tensions with Peter lead to an inevitable distance from the person she loves most. In Waterfall, Iranian-Australian filmmaker Nora Niasari draws on her personal experiences of straddling two cultures – juxtaposing a troubled family against the beautiful lush landscape, as their shared displacement and isolation reveals their true feelings about each other.

Writer / Director – Nora Niasari

Producer – Mary Minas